Yorkshire and Humber Hub Day 2019

Key points

  • A statement is an accurate account of a person or professional’s involvement with an individual adult, child or family
  • A statement can be requested from various sources, including solicitors, a social worker or guardian
  • The statement should be truthful, accurate and factual

Responsibilities

Speech and language therapists must follow the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) standards.

More details on HCPC standards and related RCSLT guidance can be found here.

More details on speech and language therapist’s duty-of-care can be found here.

What is a statement?

A statement is an accurate account of a person or professional’s involvement with an individual adult, child or family for a professional reason during the course of undertaking their duties.

Who might request a statement?

  • The employing authority
  • A solicitor
  • A social worker
  • A guardian ad litem (an officer appointed by the court to represent the interests of the child)
  • others

Principles

  • The statement should be truthful, accurate and factual.
  • The facts should, to the best knowledge of the therapist, be verifiable.
  • The statement should be made from the records.

Guidance

Before making a statement, the professional should first establish the employing authority’s policy for professionals making a statement. This will usually include contacting a line-manager in the first instance.

When writing a statement, the following format should be followed:

  • Date of statement
  • Name, professional address and qualifications, position and employing authority
  • Name, address and relationship of family and member/s about whom the statement is written
  • The sequence of events in chronological order, e.g. sub-headings with dates of each contact and an explanation of what took place or was observed. A record of any clinical measurement/treatment should be included
  • In chronological order, any other communication or attempted communication, e.g. telephone calls, visits, failed appointments, contact with other agencies/disciplines

The above should be in short paragraphs to facilitate reading. Advice should be taken from the legal officer retained by the authority.

Resources

Professional Autonomy and Accountability provides guidance to support you in adhering to the standards of the regulator, the Health Care Professions Council (HCPC).

Practice Direction 35 Experts and Assessors

HCPC Practice Note Assessors and expert witnesses

Contributors

  • Kathryn Cann,
  • Sadia Hussain
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